Albany teen planned attack, own death

2013-05-29T08:00:00Z 2013-05-29T09:49:35Z Albany teen planned attack, own deathCorvallis Gazette-Times Corvallis Gazette Times
May 29, 2013 8:00 am  • 

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Grant Acord arraigned, held on $2 million bail; court papers reveal details of plot to bomb West Albany High School

“Light and throw napalm, unzip bag and begin firing. Cooly state: ‘the Russian grim reaper is here.’”

Those were among the written plans found in a hidden compartment in 17-year-old Grant Alan Acord’s room last week, prosecutors charged Tuesday as Acord was arraigned in Benton County Circuit Court.

Accused of building homemade bombs and planning an attack on his school, the West Albany High School junior appeared in court through video arraignment from the Linn Benton Juvenile Detention Center.

Although Acord attends school in Linn County, he is being prosecuted in Benton County, where his North Albany residence is located.

Dressed in a jail-orange shirt with a gray sweatshirt over the top, he stood in front of a microphone, frowning and looking down. He spoke on only two occasions during the proceeding — to confirm that he could hear the judge and to confirm that he understood the terms of his bail and potential release.

Benton County Circuit Court Judge Matthew Donohue set bail at $2 million with conditions of release including 24-hour adult supervision, no contact with West Albany High School and no possession of weapons.

Acord remained in custody at the juvenile facility on Tuesday.

Defense attorney Jennifer Nash was assigned to his case.

“At this point we will not enter a plea on his behalf,” Nash said during the proceeding. She declined to comment outside of the courtroom.

Acord’s mother, Marianne Fox, attended the hearing, along with a crowd of print and broadcast news crews.

Acord faces one count of aggravated attempted murder and six counts each of manufacturing a destructive device, possession of a destructive device and possession of a weapon with intent to use it against another person. All 19 charges are felonies.

His next hearing is scheduled June 4.

Albany police arrested Acord on Thursday night, after the mother of 17-year-old Truman Templeton, a friend of Acord’s, told authorities that Acord planned to blow up the school.

Investigators found six homemade bombs in a hidden compartment under a floorboard in Acord’s room at his mother’s house, according to the probable-cause affidavit filed in court. The weapons consisted of two pipe bombs filled with gunpowder, two Molotov cocktails with a napalm-like mixture inside and two bombs made from plastic bottles, aluminum foil and Drano.

In addition, investigators seized several handwritten journals and handwritten and typed lists, timelines and diagrams that investigators say detail Acord’s alleged plot — from the trenchcoat he would wear on the day of the attack to the guns and ammunition he intended to acquire.

In the writings, Acord appeared to compare himself to the two teenagers who killed 13 people and injured 21 others at the Columbine High School shooting in 1999, according to the probable-cause affidavit. The two high school seniors committed suicide after the attack.

Court documents released Tuesday detailed one version of the plan.

“Get gear out of truck,” the plan read in part. “Carry duffle in one hand, napalm firebomb in the other, walk towards school ... Drop duffle. Light and throw napalm, unzip bag and begin firing. Cooly state ‘The Russian grim reaper is here,’” a line of dialogue from the movie “Bad Boys 2.”

The plan continues: “If 3rd exit is blocked by napalm fire, or is locked, run to 1st entrance. In either entrance, throw a smoke bomb prior to walking in. Proceed to enter the school, then shoot and throw bombs throughout the school.”

And the ending: “Kill myself before S.W.A.T engages me.”

Copyright 2015 Corvallis Gazette Times. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

(4) Comments

  1. TaxMaverick
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    TaxMaverick - May 29, 2013 8:11 pm
    I doubt he intends to murder anyone. If he did, he would have done it. Instead, he wrote letters about it and showed them to other kids until someone told on him. It's a cry for help, to get out of some situation. He's probably being bullied at school.
  2. captain america
    Report Abuse
    captain america - May 29, 2013 10:41 am
    If he is guilty, He has gotten everything he could hope for. Complete coverage and the spotlight of america.
  3. Colleen Tix-Comix
    Report Abuse
    Colleen Tix-Comix - May 28, 2013 7:15 pm
    It is irrelevant whether Youtube has bomb making videos or not. They have howtos for a lot of illegal and dangerous activities. So what? I think we all putzed around in chemistry lab or in our garages trying to make things go fizz boom. Yes we messed around with illegal fireworks too. The difference is we did not have a documented intent to murder people.

    They took this kid in to prevent a mass murder. I really don't care if his life is ruined or not. I care much more about the multiple lives that HE had a plan to ruin permanently.

  4. TaxMaverick
    Report Abuse
    TaxMaverick - May 28, 2013 6:15 pm
    Kids making bombs is common. My friends and I did it when were kids. YouTube has a bunch of homemade bomb videos.

    Now, the television-watching government workers in Oregon are snatching a kid with homemade bombs and ruining his life because they want to be a part of the latest television fad.

    This kids is also stupid for imitating what he sees on television. Maybe he's getting bullied and/or wants attention.

    Television is poison. This whole dog-and-pony show is stupid.
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