Let’s say you have health insurance. It covers in-network and out-of network. OK so far.

Then you try to make an appointment with your GP or internist at a clinic. You’ve been seeing this doctor for years, not just very often. You are told you can’t make an appointment with him but would you like to see a specialist? Wait. How do you get a referral if you can’t see your GP? Wait. Good question, you are told. Wait a minute. No answer forthcoming. Why can’t I see my GP? Well, he is out of network. My insurance covers out of network. What’s the problem? I’ll have to refer you to my supervisor. Wait ... what the ... it’s our policy to ... blah blah blah blah blah.

OK, this is getting tense.

I call my insurance. We are covered for out-of-network services. We just have to pay a higher co-pay. Insurance calls clinic in a three-way call. What’s the problem? Blah blah blah blah ... insurance says it’s against the clinic's contract with the insurance company to do whatever this is. Well, that’s our policy.

My husband decides to forget the whole matter and go somewhere else. Maybe that’s the whole motivation for the actions of the clinic, which shall go unnamed. This is not an Obamacare issue. This is a switch and bait to have patients see specialists or immediate care which have higher co-pays and deductible. Or else, what would it be? Wait ...

Yvonne Mccallister

Corvallis (Dec. 31)

0
0
0
0
0

Load comments