I have been deciding how to vote on Measure 101, so I took Dianne Farrell's suggestion (Gazette-Times letters, Jan. 4) and read the entire voters' pamphlet. The first thing I noticed was that her assertion that all the letters in opposition were written by just two people, is in error. When I counted the signers of the letters for, I counted 78, not two. When someone needlessly misrepresents the data, like this, I become suspicious that their conclusions also could be in error.

The writers of the letters in opposition are against additional taxes on health care, such as proposed by Measure 101 (the ballot title calls it an assessment, but it is really a sales tax), pointing out the multiple millions of wasted dollars spent by the state on past health care programs. The organizations in favor are unions like the SEIU, which will get even more benefits, and organizations that can pass the additional taxes on to their customers. The latter get benefits, but don't pay while the former pay, but get no benefits.

Measure 101 reminds me a lot of Measure 97 of a few years ago, promoted by unions, that would have created a sales tax (but was called something else) that was soundly defeated by voters. Measure 101 should suffer the same fate.

Jay Burreson

Corvallis (Jan. 6)

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