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100 Years Ago

1917

ROUND-UP: The Philomath Round-Up Association has just contracted for the greatest array of Round-Up attractions ever shown at a like occasion in the Northwest, with the possible exception of that at Pendleton, and the big show June 20, 21 and 22 will be even better than the Pendleton Round-Up in the earlier days of that wonderful exhibition, when it was most popular. As a matter of fact, the Philomath live wires have contracted with 25 of the very best attractions at the Pendleton Round-Up last year, and which at a later date will be in the great arena of the Eastern Oregon show this year. (Published May 2, 1917, in the Corvallis Gazette-Times).

FUTURE: Philomath, already the most beautiful and altogether lovely of the smaller communities of the state, is now looking forward to becoming one of the hustling industrial centers, as well as the greatest “Round-Up” town in the universe. Our latest addition is a factory to make tool handles, maple and fir broom handles, ladders, lawn furniture and turned products, the old Horning mill site to be the scene of activities. Thomas J. Glover, of Portland, and John Webster will operate under the name of the Beaver Wood Products Co., and when things are finally opened up, expect to develop a small business into a concern worthy of more than passing notice. (Published May 5, 1917, in the Corvallis Gazette-Times).

NOTEWORTHY: Grandma Rayburn, Philomath’s oldest resident who makes her home with her daughter, Mrs. E.L. Sharpe, is quite poorly. She is in her 89th year, and came to Oregon in 1847. … The boys who enlisted in the Army passed through Albany on the eve of April 25, bound for Houston, Texas. Philomath turned out en masse to bid them Godspeed and wish them a safe return. The Philomath group consisted of Emmett Hood, Fred Barnum, Lyle Smith, Edwin Soule and Billie Sharpe. (Published May 5, 1917, in the Corvallis Gazette-Times).

PLANTING: The delay in spring farm work caused by the continued rains has brought on an unusual rush of spring work among the farmers of the Philomath section. That they are, in general, increasing the area planted also accounts for the increased activity. As yet there seems to be no great shortage of labor but the vacant lot farmer and the small tract farmer are finding it very difficult to get their plowing done as the “odd job” plowman is working overtime. The backyard farmer has tackled his little patch with the spade. Some entire lots are being spaded and the season’s planting is progressing rapidly. (Pubilshed May 2, 1917, in the Oregon Daily Journal, Salem).

Compiled by Brad Fuqua, Philomath Express

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