Oregon Ballot Measures

An initiative aimed at repealing Oregon's sanctuary state status garnered opposition from a coalition, including Nike, on Friday, the day after supporters announced they had enough signatures to potentially qualify for the November ballot.

Editor’s Note: As a convenience to Philomath Express readers, here’s a sampling of other news going on around Oregon as reported by The Associated Press.

Anti-abortion, sanctuary measures hit signature deadline

SALEM — An initiative aimed at repealing Oregon's sanctuary state status garnered opposition from a coalition including Nike on Friday, the day after supporters announced they had enough signatures to potentially qualify for the November ballot.

Organizers for Oregonians United Against Profiling said that along with the Portland-based corporation, they've secured support from several state legislators, Multnomah County's district attorney and sheriff, and the Oregon AFL-CIO.

The announcement came the day after a report that backers of Initiative Petition 22 delivered 105,000 signatures to the Oregon secretary of state, bringing them within striking distance of the November general election ballot.

Backers of an anti-abortion measure, Initiative Petition 1, also turned in enough signatures to likely be placed on the ballot.

It could take several weeks for state elections officials to certify there are enough valid signatures collected.

Two other tax-related measures turned in signatures and enough of those were found valid, placing them definitively on the ballot, said Deb Royal, of the Oregon Secretary of State's Office.

Those opposed to repealing Oregon's sanctuary state status said they were prepared to campaign hard against the measure, should enough signatures qualify.

"Oregon's existing 'sanctuary' law has been protecting Oregonians from unfair racial profiling for more than 30 years," said Andrea Williams, executive director of Causa Oregon.

"No Oregonian, including those who may be undocumented immigrants, should have to live in fear that doing basic things like going to work or school or reporting a crime to police could result in harassment or their families being torn apart."

The anti-abortion measure would prohibit the state from paying for insurance that covers abortion except in limited circumstances, such as to protect the life of the mother.

Meanwhile, Gov. Kate Brown, a Democrat, struck a deal with union and business officials to keep a tax-related initiative off the November ballot that would require large, publicly held corporations to reveal more about their operations in Oregon and how much they pay in state and local taxes, according to a report by Oregon Public Broadcasting.

The proposed measure had been supported by unions but major corporations based in Oregon said it would hurt business.

In exchange, some major corporate figures agreed to join labor officials in opposing two tax measures sought by other business interests.

Those measures would exempt groceries from new taxes on sales and require a three-fifths legislative vote for bills raising revenue, OPB reported.

The grocery measure, Initiative Petition 37, had already qualified for the ballot before Friday.

Brown had also wanted to reach a deal on the proposed measure to require a supermajority for revenue-raising bills — Initiative Petition 31 — but did not get it.

That measure also qualified for the ballot Friday, Royal said.

Brown has been trying to avoid a showdown between labor and business interests like the one that unfolded in 2016 over a corporate tax measure.

Most initiative sponsors try to deliver at least several thousand signatures more than the 88,184 required to qualify for the ballot, to compensate for any that end up disqualified.

The deadline for turning in signatures to the secretary of state's office was 5 p.m. Friday.

Family: University must disarm officers after fatality

PORTLAND — The family of a black man who was fatally shot by Portland State University campus police demanded Friday that the university immediately disarm its campus officers.

Jason Erik Washington was shot on June 29 while trying to break up a fight outside a bar near the university's downtown campus.

In the family's first public statements on the shooting, Washington's brother compared the incident to other high-profile shootings of black men, Oregon Public Broadcasting reported . Family members attended a news conference and stood side-by-side wearing T-shirts bearing Washington's image as Andre Washington spoke.

"What this community experienced on the morning of June 29, 2018 is not uncommon in this city and around the country," said Andre Washington. "Black men being gunned down by white police officers is an affliction in America."

The family also demanded that the two officers involved, identified by the university as Shawn McKenzie and James Dewey, be fired.

McKenzie and Dewey were placed on paid administrative leave following the shooting.

Authorities have not said how many bullets were fired or whose shots hit Washington.

The Portland Police Bureau is investigating the shooting.

Cellphone video shot by a witness shows Washington repeatedly trying to restrain a friend as a group of other men follow them down a sidewalk. It seems as if Washington is about to succeed in getting his friend inside and away from a fight when the friend breaks away and swings at someone and is knocked to the ground.

Washington enters the fray and is knocked to the ground. As he falls, a black object can be seen in his hip pocket.

The camera jerks away from the action shortly after the fall and doesn't show the shooting, but someone can be heard shouting, "Gun!"

Witness Keyaira Smith told several news outlets that the object was a gun. Washington was shot as he was trying to retrieve it from the sidewalk, she has said.

Washington, a Navy veteran, a father of three, a grandfather and an employee of the U.S. Postal Service, had a valid license to carry a concealed weapon in Multnomah County, where Portland is located.

"Jason Washington supported the Second Amendment. Jason Washington supported social issues. And perhaps the most ironic of all, Jason Washington supported the police," his brother said. "Think about that."

The university issued a statement after the rally, saying that PSU offers its "deepest condolences to Jason Washington's family."

"We fully recognize the severity of what has occurred," the statement said. "We understand there are a lot of unanswered questions right now, and it's very important to answer them. That's why it's important to have multiple comprehensive investigations."

PSU students staged an earlier protest over the university's decision to arm its campus police.

The university's board of trustees voted in 2015 to arm its police force over objections from students.

A vigil was planned for later Friday at the location where Washington was shot.

Kah-Nee-Ta Resort to close, 146 employees to lose jobs

PORTLAND — One of Oregon's biggest resorts is set to close this summer and 146 employees will lose their jobs.

The Oregonian/OregonLive reports Kah-Nee-Ta Resort and Spa, which operates on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation in central Oregon, announced Friday that it will shutter all operations Sept. 5.

An announcement sent from interim general manager Marie Kay Williams says the decision came as the "the resort cannot continue operating below a self-sustaining level."

She wrote that closing the resort is necessary to protect the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs from further financial risk.

With the closing of the resort, 146 employees will be laid off. That includes spa, restaurant, maintenance, room service and administrative workers.

Williams didn’t return calls for comment on the decision.

Subscribe to Breaking News

* I understand and agree that registration on or use of this site constitutes agreement to its user agreement and privacy policy.
0
0
0
0
0