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Corvallis City Council delays board restructuring
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Corvallis City Council delays board restructuring

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Here is a look at property along Southwest Country Club Drive that developers hope to develop into housing. The Corvallis Planning Commission backed the required annexation and zone changes the proposal requires at its Jan. 20 meeting and the City Council backed the plan on Monday.

Corvallis’ project to rework its advisory boards and commission proved to be not ready for prime time Monday.

Councilors voted unanimously at its remote session to table the plan and reconsider it April 19. Some meeting participants viewed the April 19 as a bit aggressive, and the process might move into May or even June.

An eight-person ad-hoc committee, chaired by Ward 9 Councilor Andrew Struthers, will be reformed to work on refining the proposal. On the panel with Struthers will be Councilors Charlyn Ellis (Ward 5), Hyatt Lytle (Ward 3) and Paul Shaffer (Ward 7) as well as Community Development Director Paul Bilotta, Library Director Ashlee Chavez, City Attorney Jim Brewer and Public Information Officer Patrick Rollens.

Ellis and Ward 1’s Jan Napack expressed the most concerns with the proposal. Ellis noted that it contained items that the earlier ad-hoc committee had not discussed, and Napack added that “I’m not prepared to accept something I don’t have a lot of answers for. I don’t think it’s doable in a council session.”

Nearly 4 million doses of the newest COVID-19 vaccine will to be delivered to states for injections starting on Tuesday.

Work on updating the city’s more than 20 boards and commissions began in July 2019, although an earlier committee, the Public Participation Task Force, laid some of the groundwork during its September 2013 to June 2014 life span.

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A July 18, 2019 work session led to a total of eight full council meetings and work sessions at which the update was discussed. December 2019 was the original target date for completion. The first ad-hoc committee met eight times starting in July of 2020. The goal as the committee began work was to complete the work by January.

“We’re not putting the brakes on this, we’re moving forward,” Struthers said.

In other highlights:

Corvida: Councilors unanimously approved the annexation and zone change on the Corvida property along Southwest Country Club Drive. The issue required five votes, one on the annexation and four special ordinances to complete the process. The votes added 3.37 acres to the city’s stock of land, changed the zoning on that acreage to low density residential (RS-6); and changed the zoning on an adjacent 0.99 acres already in the city limits to RS-6.

The property lies just north of Country Club Drive between 53rd Street and 55th Street. If the Corvida property is developed it will add perhaps as many as 20 units of housing to an area that is experiencing a boom in both completed, under construction and proposed developments.

The Sylvia and Russell Gardens subdivisions are nearby, and infrastructure work is underway on a project along Country Club behind Starker Arts Park. The Carson property, which is set to include apartments, is essentially across the street from Corvida, and Ridgecrest, another subdivision, is taking shape along Southwest Kara Avenue between Country Club and Nash.

SDCs: Councilors unanimously passed new system development charges (SDCs). The rate adjustments take place annually. SDCs are charged for new development to pay for water, sewer, streets, drainage and parks and recreation uses. The new rates include changes of between 3.2% for second level water to 6.6% for parks and recreation. The new total of SDCs per single-family residence rises from $16,006 to $16.930. The number puts Corvallis in the middle of a list of comparator cities. Garibaldi is at the bottom, at $9,201 and Lake Oswego is the most expensive at $41,868.

Contact reporter James Day at jim.day@lee.net or 541-812-6116. Follow at Twitter.com/jameshday or gazettetimes.com/blogs/jim-day.

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