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ROSE (roz) n. One of the most beautiful of all flowers, a symbol of fragrance and loveliness. Often given as a sign of appreciation.

RASPBERRY (raz’ber’e) n. A sharp, scornful comment, criticism or rebuke; a derisive, splatting noise, often called the Bronx cheer.

We hereby deliver:

• ROSES to the fun and perfect weather for the 24th oh-so-very-Corvallis festival, da Vinci Days. Not the mishap with the aerialist or the usual small glitches could mar what was a fun endeavor and great first outing for new executive director Nicole Beachboard-Dodson.

Is it even possible that Fall Festival is in a few short weeks? Just look at the changing colors of the top branches of vine maple, the season’s first indicator that fall is not far now.

But as with our odd calendar, our warmest days of the year likely still are ahead of us, so here is a timely reminder:

• • •

• ROSE-BERRIES to a lesson that needs to be learned every single summer.

At 3:30 p.m., during the hottest part of the day, Doodles, a 1-year-old dachshund, was left inside a blanket-draped dog kennel inside a Subaru parked with the windows cracked only two inches. The car was in the Enchanted Forest RV park, and the exterior temp was 91 degrees in that parking lot — much hotter inside.

Long story short, Sr. Deputy Scott Lumley got the call, located and arrested the dog’s owner for animal neglect and gave the dog some water and put Doodles in an air-conditioned patrol car. He seems to be doing fine and is now back with the owner’s wife. We hope he’s a little wiser. He is lucky; his dog is alive.

• • •

• ROSES to family and friends of Geoff Tomlinson.

On Saturday, July 21, former Corvallis mayor Charlie Tomlinson and his wife, Maria, gathered in Corvallis First Presbyterian Church to note the 27th birthday of their son, who had died July 4 after a sudden, undiagnosed medical crisis.

Geoff Tomlinson was employed at the KidSpirit enhancement program at Oregon State University, where he was well regarded as a mentor, friend, trusted employee and someone that everyone could rely on.

He was a computer sciences graduate and an avid runner who sometimes combined hang time with friends and co-workers with a brisk run.

We interviewed him in March 2011 for a story about a class in half-marathoning in which we asked participants why they run. Part of his answer:

“ ... It’s a time to think about the day and what’s going on in your life. It helps you to work through your problems. You have that time to think.”

After hearing his friends, family and co-workers talk about Geoff Tomlinson during his memorial, it’s evident that he had the same kind of leadership potential as his parents — and had influenced many people in his time on Earth. We wish Charlie and Maria and the rest of the Tomlinson family all the best during this difficult time.

• • •

• RASPBERRIES to the latest chapter in our ongoing saga, “The Scam of the Week.”

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Two readers called to let us know that they had received phone calls from a man who spoke with a heavy accent and who told them that they needed to update information to have their Medicare reinstated.

Of course, this is the sort of nonsense up with which we will not put. (To paraphrase Winston Churchill.)

No doubt to gain trust, the man repeated their names and phone numbers and addresses and then asked for their banking information.

Fortunately neither of our callers fell for that. They called police, but of course it’s the usual story: These calls are made from a disposable phone and usually have a blocked number, so police have little to go on.

So, it is up to us to keep warning each other of the various scams out there, particularly those targeting older people.

• • •

• ROSES to something else we love about Corvallis: Honesty is just routine among most people.

A relative newcomer was impressed that someone returned a wallet to the police department.

But we told her that the same day, a tall man casually walked up to an employee of one of our fine coffee shops and asked, with no alarm, “Anyone turn in a wallet?”

The employee — who knew the man and that he was the wallet’s owner — just handed over the wallet.

Thanks were exchanged, but it was no big deal. Because that is how things should be. Glad that in Corvallis, they often are.

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