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Airlines worked Saturday to deliver luggage to passengers around the world after a technical breakdown left at least 1,500 bags stuck at Paris’ Charles de Gaulle airport. It was the latest of several tangles hitting travelers this summer. The airport operator said the baggage sorting system had a technical malfunction Friday morning that caused 15 flights to leave without luggage. The airport handled about 1,300 flights overall Friday, the airport operator said. It came as airport workers are on strike at French airports to demand more hiring and higher pay to keep up with inflation.

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The 12 jurors chosen this past week to decide whether Florida school shooter Nikolas Cruz is executed will be exposed to horrific images and emotional testimony, but must deal with any mental anguish alone. The jurors and their alternates will tour the bloodstained building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland where Cruz murdered 17 in 2018. They will see graphic security videos of teens being shot point-blank. They will hear tearful testimony from survivors and parents. And they will be told not to talk about any of it with anyone. If jurors need help, they are on their own. Florida and most states do not provide post-trial mental health counseling.

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The Texas Supreme Court has blocked a lower court order that gave some abortion clinics confidence to resume performing abortions. The order handed down Friday night by the state’s highest court comes just days after some abortion providers rushed to resume services. A lower court order issued this week by a Houston judge had reassured some doctors that they could temporarily resume abortions up to six weeks into pregnancy. Before that, doctors had stopped performing abortions in the state after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and ended the constitutional right to abortion.

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Medication abortions were the preferred method for ending pregnancy in the U.S. even before the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade. As more states seek abortion limits, demand is expected to grow. They involve using two prescription medicines days apart _ pills that can be taken at home or in a clinic. The drug mifepristone is taken first. It blocks the effects of the hormone progesterone, which is needed to sustain a pregnancy. Misoprostol is taken 24 to 48 hours later. It cause the womb to contract, expelling the pregnancy. Use of the pills has been increasing in recent years.

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Pope Francis is urging the people and leaders of Congo and South Sudan to “turn a page” and forge new paths of reconciliation, peace and development. Francis issued a video message on the day he had planned to begin a weeklong pilgrimage to the two African countries. He canceled the trip last month because of knee pain that makes walking and standing difficult. In the message delivered Saturday, Francis said he was “greatly disappointed” by the turn of events and promised to reschedule “as soon as possible.” He sent his No. 2, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, to visit both Congo and South Sudan on the days the pope was supposed to have been there.

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Abortion, guns and religion _ a major change in the law in any one of these areas would have made for a fateful Supreme Court term. In its first full term together, the court’s conservative majority ruled in all three and issued other significant decisions limiting the government’s regulatory powers. And it has signaled no plans to slow down. With three appointees of former President Donald Trump in their 50s, the six-justice conservative majority seems poised to keep control of the court for years to come, if not decades. Its remaining opinions issued, the court began its summer recess Thursday, and the justices will next return to the courtroom in October.

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The Texas Supreme Court has blocked a lower court order that had given some abortion clinics confidence to resume performing abortions. The order handed down Friday night by the state’s highest court comes just days after some abortion providers rushed to resume services. An lower court order issued this week by a Houston judge had reassured some doctors they could temporarily resume abortions up to six weeks into pregnancy. Before that, doctors across Texas had stopped performing abortions in the state after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and ended the constitutional right to abortion.

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The North Carolina General Assembly has wrapped up its chief work session for the year. It adjourned on Friday after finalizing proposed state budget adjustments for the new fiscal year and crossing off other must-do legislation. The budget bill headed to Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper, who must decide whether to sign it, veto it or let it become law. More than 30 Democrats joined all Republicans on Friday in voting for the spending measure. Some big policy matters like Medicaid expansion, medical marijuana and sports betting remain unresolved or were thwarted during the six-week session. The legislature could consider any Cooper vetoes in a few weeks.

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New York’s legislature has approved a sweeping overhaul of the state’s handgun licensing rules, seeking to preserve some limits after the Supreme Court said people have a right to carry a handgun for personal protection. Gov. Kathy Hochul signed the measure into law after it passed both chambers by wide margins. The law is almost sure to draw more legal challenges from gun-rights advocates who said the state is still putting too many restrictions on who can get a gun and where they can carry it. Backers said the new law will strike the right balance between complying with the Supreme Court’s ruling and trying to ensure that weapons stay out of the hands of criminals.

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Democrats and their aligned groups raised more than $80 million in the week after the Supreme Court stripped away a woman’s constitutional right to have an abortion. The flood of cash offers one of the first tangible signs that the ruling may energize voters. But party officials say donors have given much of that money to national campaigns and causes instead of races for state office, where abortion policy will be shaped as a result of the court’s decision. That’s where Republicans wield disproportionate power. The fundraising disparity is exasperating the party's base.

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Cybersecurity experts say the California Department of Justice apparently failed to follow basic security procedures on its website. That lapse exposed the personal information of potentially hundreds of thousands of gun owners. The website was designed to only show general data about the number and location of concealed carry gun permits. But for about 24 hours starting Monday a spreadsheet with names and personal information was just a few clicks away, ready for review or downloading. Experts say there should have been controls to make sure the information stayed out of the reach of unwanted parties. The sensitive data should have been encrypted.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a new state law ending arrests for loitering for prostitution. The issue divided sex workers and advocates during a rare nine-month delay since state lawmakers passed the bill last year. Newsom noted Friday that the bill does not legalize prostitution. It revokes provisions that he says have led to disproportionate harassment of women and transgender adults. The measure also will allow those who were previously convicted to ask a court to seal the record of conviction. Some law enforcement groups say the repeal will make it harder both to confront those who commit crimes related to prostitution and human trafficking and to help those being victimized.

Now that Deshaun Watson’s disciplinary hearing has concluded, the best solution for the NFL and the quarterback's legal team is to reach a settlement before retired judge Sue Robinson issues a decision. Watson was accused of sexual misconduct by 24 women and has settled 20 of the civil lawsuits. A settlement with the NFL would avoid an appeal that undermines the collectively bargained process with a disciplinary officer and prevents a potential court case. The longer the process drags, the messier it can get. And, it’s already ugly.

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A federal judge has ruled Arizona has been violating the constitutional rights of incarcerated people in state-run prisons by providing them with inadequate medical and mental health care. Judge Roslyn Silver said the problems stem largely from not having enough health employees to care for the roughly 25,000 incarcerated people housed in state-run prisons. She said corrections officials have made no significant attempts to fix the understaffing problem. Silver said Corrections Director David Shinn’s claim that prisoners often have greater access to health service than people who aren’t locked up was “completely detached from reality.” Shinn’s office had no immediate comment on the ruling.

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California voters will weigh in on seven ballot measures this fall. It's the fewest number to appear on a statewide general election ballot since 2014. Thursday was the deadline to qualify measures for the November ballot. One question was placed on the ballot by the state Legislature and six are initiatives that gathered enough verified signatures to go before voters. Voters will be asked to weigh in on issues including whether to enshrine the right to an abortion in the California Constitution, whether to expand sports betting and whether to set aside public school funding for arts and music.

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The U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that had provided a constitutional right to abortion. The June 24 ruling is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states. In anticipation of the decision, several states led by Democrats have taken steps to protect abortion access. The decision also sets up the potential for legal fights between the states over whether providers and those who help women obtain abortions can be sued or prosecuted.

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FBI agents looking into events surrounding former President Donald Trump’s efforts to overturn his 2020 election loss have subpoenaed Arizona Senate President Karen Fann. The Prescott Republican orchestrated a discredited review of the election and she says she and a second Republican senator who has aggressively promoted the lie that Trump lost because of fraud were subpoenaed last week. Fann said Friday the subpoena seeks emails and text messages she has sent or received to more than a dozen people and she believes she's already released all of them under public records requests. The Department of Justice has been seeking information from people involved in Trump's efforts to discredit the 2020 election results or the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol.

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Decades of anti-abortion laws have been created in some states, and many of them conflict with each other. Idaho has nearly three dozen anti-abortion laws dating back to 1973, and Attorney General Lawrence Wasden's office says he i giving them all a close look to see which might be enforceable now that the U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade. But it's not an easy question — in Arizona, leaders in the Republican Party disagree over whether an abortion law from 1901 should be enforced over a 2022 version. Grant Loebs is the president of the Idaho Prosecuting Attorneys Association. He says decision on whether to charge someone under an older abortion law will probably come down to individual prosecutors at first.

Federal prosecutors say they will recommend no more than 27 months in prison for a Washington woman who defrauded friends and acquaintances of more than $600,000 by falsely claiming she needed money for tuition, multiple sclerosis treatment and other causes. Sabrina Taylor, of Tacoma, pleaded guilty to wire fraud in U.S. District Court in Seattle on Friday. The 40-year-old admitted she lied about her health, employment status and education to get money from her victims, including some she met on online using shared interests such as Japanese anime. The U.S. Attorney’s Office said she spent much of the money on shopping and trips to Japan and Korea.

North Carolina's Democratic attorney general has not yet indicated whether he will ask a court to lift the injunction on a state law banning abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Attorney General Josh Stein told Republican lawmakers on Friday that his department’s attorneys are reviewing the litigation that led a federal court to strike down the 20-week ban. His letter responds to GOP demands that he take immediate action in the wake of last week's U.S. Supreme Court ruling that overturned abortion protections. Senate leader Phil Berger and House Speaker Tim Moore warned last week Stein's inaction would lead them to get involved.

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Amazon is barring off-duty warehouse workers from the company’s facilities. Under the policy, employees are barred from accessing buildings or other working areas on their scheduled days off, and before or after their shifts. Amazon says the policy does not prohibit off-duty employees from engaging co-workers in “non-working areas” outside company’s buildings. It also says the policy will not be enforced discriminatorily against employees seeking to unionize. But organizers say the new rule will hinder union drives. Amazon had previously barred employee access to non-working areas beyond 15 minutes before or after their shifts. It rescinded that policy when it entered a settlement with federal labor officials in December.

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The first lawsuits have been filed following an Amtrak train collision and derailment in rural Missouri that killed four people and injured up to 150 others. Surviving passenger Janet Williams of Dubuque, Iowa, filed a federal lawsuit Friday naming Amtrak, BNSF Railway and MS Contracting, the employer of the dump truck driver who died when his vehicle was struck. The complaint alleges negligent design of the railroad crossing, and says the train was packed with too many riders. The Kansas City Star reports that Amtrak and BNSF sued MS Contracting Thursday, saying the train was “clearly visible.” Truck driver Billy Barton II died in the collision, along with three passengers. Barton's widow sued Chariton County and a BNSF official on Thursday.

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The Los Angeles Police Department says Charlotte Hornets forward Miles Bridges has been charged with felony domestic violence. Bridges was arrested Wednesday for “intimate partner violence with injury,” which is a felony. The incident occurred two days earlier in West Los Angeles. He was released on $130,000 bond. He has a July 20 court date. The 24-year-old Bridges is a restricted free agent who had been expected to command big money in the free agent market this summer. His agent has not returned calls seeking comment.

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The Indiana Department of Health says the number of abortions performed in the state rose by 8.5% last year. The data release comes as lawmakers in the Republican-dominated Legislature prepare to debate tighter abortion laws following the overturning of Roe v. Wade. The Health Department's annual report shows 8,414 abortions were performed in the state during 2021. That’s 658 more than the 7,756 abortions during 2020 in Indiana. About 56% of abortions in Indiana last year were drug induced, a slight increase from 2020 when, for the first time, they accounted for a majority at 55%.

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